Visits-Tonight At Noon-Liverpool Central Library.

I came across this exhibition by accident on a quick visit into Liverpool Central  library to drop my books off. I always like to have a look round as it is lovely and I am very glad that I did.

Tonight At Noon is a series of exhibitions and events to celebrate 50 years since the publication of ‘The Mersey Sound’ by Liverpool Poets Adrian Henri, Roger McGough and Brian Patten. I discovered Brian Patten’s work in my early 20’s after splitting up with a boyfriend. I read Love poems until the spine fell out of the book, but I still have it and I occasionally revisit it.

The first thing you notice is the amount of colour in the exhibition. All 60’s fonts and mixed colours and there is a sense of deep nostalgia looking through it all.  The exhibition has been curated by Catherine Marcangeli, who is the partner of the late Adrian Henri  My quick visit turned into an hour and it was the best hour.

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The font on this book and the design is beautiful and is completely timeless.

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I like on this cover, that all bases are covered, Birkdale for the golf, Runcorn Bridge, New Brighton, Bidston. I looked to find out more about the festival as I wanted to see the artworks and literature they used and what was shown but there doesn’t seem to be that much. There are mentions HERE and HERE. I will keep looking.

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Look at this cover! I have been looking for a copy ever since but it is not this one I have seen. I have lots of bases covered so it will be mine one day.

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Summer with Monika, I read years ago and I think there is still a copy in the loft. It is weird really how much I associated this exhibition with things in my life from years ago. Maybe as Liverpool is near to me or that my family are from there, the places I used to go to or the company I kept. I don’t know.

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The atrium of Central Library.

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I took a small trip before I left to see my favourite book cover of all time. George Maws- The Genus Crocus. I have always been fascinated by it and Faith Shannon’s cover design is perfect. She is someone I really admire and the breadth and design of her work is wonderful. You can read more about her HERE.

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Exhibition leaflet- The exhibition is on until the 15th July 2017 in the Hornby Library. More about the events surrounding it are HERE. There is also a radio show on BBC Radio 4 where Roger McGough and Brian Patten discuss the making of The Mersey Sound. Listen HERE.

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All websites and links accessed- 13th June 2017.

Project 1- The Life Cycle of Textiles and Materials.

Stages of textile product life cycle.

1. Agriculture/raw fibre production- growing the products that you want and need for use.

Agriculture-

‘The science or practice of farming, including cultivation of the soil for the growing of crops and the rearing of animals to provide food, wool, and other products.’

 https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/agriculture– accessed 12th June 2017.

Raw-

‘(of a material or substance) in its natural state; unprocessed.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/raw-accessed 12th June 2017.

Fibre-

‘A thread or filament from which a vegetable tissue, mineral substance, or textile is formed.’

‘The growing of the product and the creation of what it is you want to grow and want to make.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/fibre– accessed 12th June 2017.

Production-

‘The action of making or manufacturing from components or raw materials, or the process of being so manufactured.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/production– accessed 12th June 2017.

shearing-9

http://byjus.com/chemistry/extraction-of-wool/-accessed 12th June 2017.

2. Ginning- collecting the product?

Ginning-

‘to clear (cotton) of seeds with a gin.’

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ginning-accessed 12th June 2017.

‘A machine for separating the fibres of cotton from the seeds.’

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/ginning-accessed 12th June 2017.

‘A cotton gin is a machine that quickly and easily separates cotton fibres from their seeds, allowing for much greater productivity than manual cotton separation. The fibres are then processed into various cotton goods such as linens, while any undamaged cotton is used largely for textiles like clothing. Seeds may be used to grow more cotton or to produce cottonseed oil.’

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton_gin– accessed 12th June 2017.

Well, I didn’t know that.

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https://dlynx.rhodes.edu/jspui/handle/10267/150-accessed 12th June 2017.

3. Spinning- spinning the material into a thread?spinning cotton on a bobbin?

Spinning-

‘The action or process of spinning; the conversion of fibres into yarn.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/spinning-accessed 12th June 2017.

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http://www.stkatherineofsiena.org/yarnspinners-of-saint-katherine-of-siena-parish.html–   -accessed 12th June 2017.

4. Weaving- weaving a pattern into a piece of fabric, cloth. Weaving a rug, a tapestry?

Form-

‘(fabric or a fabric item) by interlacing long threads passing in one direction with others at a right angle to them.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/weave-accessed 12th June 2017.

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http://www.castletownheritage.co.uk/2009%20archive%20programme.htm-accessed 12th June 2017.

5. Processing- dying fabrics, making it into an item, a shirt, dress?

‘A systematic series of mechanised or chemical operations that are performed in order to produce something.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/process-accessed 12th June 2017.

th

http://www.india.com/travel/articles/winter-shopping-in-delhi/– accessed 12th June 2017.

6. Stitching- sewing on buttons, sewing together, all various parts of a finished item need to be stitched.

‘A row of stitches sewn on to cloth., The action or work of stitching or sewing.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/stitching-accessed 12th June 2017.

blue-stitch

http://community.annthegran.com/post/2012/04/06/decorative-crazy-patch-embroidery-stitches-accessed 12th June 2017.

7. Distribution/retail- being taken to shops and buyers, put on sale in shops, in big quantities.

Distribution-

‘The action of sharing something out among a number of recipients’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/distribution-accessed 12th June 2017.

Retail-

‘The sale of goods to the public in relatively small quantities for use or consumption rather than for resale.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/retail-accessed 12th June 2017.

authorization-for-Distribution-1

http://www.accessridge.com/marketing-retention/direct-mailing-distributions/-accessed 12th June 2017.

8. Use/consumption and end of life- item is used, sat on, worn, walked on, maybe fixed over time and parts replaced. Once it is of no use it is either put in the bin-landfill or recycled- made into something else or used as a cloth round the house depending on what it is.

Consumption-

‘The action of using up a resource.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/consumption-accessed 12th June 2017.

Use-

‘Take or consume (an amount) from a limited supply.’

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/use-accessed 12th June 2017.

End of Life-

‘Spend the final part of one’s life in a specified place or state’

In this case it’s a product.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/end_one’s_days_(or_life)-accessed 12th June 2017.

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https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/sea-garbage-starts-invade-destroy-beautiful-46995175-accessed 12th June 2017.

 

Visits- Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral- William Mitchell and John Piper.

I like a good Cathedral and I am lucky that less than 10 miles away I have two to look at!

Last month I visited Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral as they have so much William Mitchell goodness on the outside, it is made of concrete and has some very impressive glass work on the inside. All of my favourite things. I must have been in countless times and each time I see something else that I have missed. It was only a quick passing trip as it was closing soon but I saw all of this;

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You can read more about William Mitchell’s pieces for the cathedral here;

http://www.william-mitchell.com/liverpool.htm– accessed 30th May 2017

Inside is a right treat and you are greeted with beautiful stained glass windows that throw coloured light everywhere. You can’t stop looking at them.

From searching I found the best thing I think I have ever seen, a film showing footage of John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens who were commissioned to design and make the stained glass windows for the Cathedral.

It is just lovely and I fell into a trance watching it.

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The Cathedral is celebrating its Golden Jubilee this year and you can find out more about the events they have planned HERE.

You can read more about John Piper HERE, Patrick Reyntiens HERE and in the autumn there is an exhibition of John Pipers work at Tate Liverpool which you can read about HERE. Exciting.

All websites and links accessed 30th May 2017.

Visits- Picasso Lino Cuts, Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight.

Back in January I went to see the Picasso lino cut exhibition at The Lady Lever Gallery in Port Sunlight. It was my first trip there and also my first time driving through the Birkenhead tunnel so lots of new things to see.

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The Lady Lever is a lovely place and Port Sunlight was a treat as I had never been before and had no idea what to expect.

‘The village was founded by ‘Soap King’ William Hesketh Lever in 1888. The village was built to house Lever’s ‘Sunlight Soap’ factory workers, but today is home to a fascinating museum, beautiful architecture, a world-class art gallery, stunning parkland and a thriving community.’

http://portsunlightvillage.com/about-us/-accessed 29th May 2017.

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‘The Lady Lever Art Gallery houses one of the UK’s finest collections of fine and decorative art. It has the best collection of Wedgwood jasperware anywhere in the world and its collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings is internationally renowned. 

The gallery was founded by William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925) and is dedicated to the memory of his wife Elizabeth.  Lever wanted to share his collections with the public. At first he used the library for small displays, but he needed a bigger building for his collections. Lever personally selected works of art from his huge collection for the gallery. The gallery still contains the best of his personal art collection.’

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ladylever/about/– accessed 29th May 2017

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Arriving at the gallery I saw the beauty of The Leverhulme Memorial, designed by James Lomax-Simpson, and the sculptor was William Reid Dick. It consists of an obelisk with a figure on the top, with a separate group of four figures beside it. The memorial was unveiled in 1930. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leverhulme_Memorial-accessed 29th May 2017.

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Napoleons death mask.

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DeidreJacob Epstein– Bronze, modelled in 1942.

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The linocuts are owned by the British Museum and some of them have never been seen outside of London before so I was excited to be able to see them. They all focus on the later part of Picasso’s career from the 1950’s and 60’s.

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Pablo Picasso (1881–1973), Nature morte sous la Lampe (Still Life under the Lamp). Linocut, 1962.-http://britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/picasso_linocuts.aspx– accessed 29th May 2017.

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It was really beautiful up close and I only had my phone to take sneak pictures so they really don’t do it justice.

‘Colour linocuts are usually made with a different block for each colour, but Picasso was unique in his use of a single block to achieve the same effect in what is known as the ‘reductive’ method. After printing the first colour, the lino plate is cleaned before cutting away the areas that will not be printed in the next colour. This process is repeated for the subsequent layers, until the print is complete.’

http://www.palatinate.org.uk/important-picasso-linocuts-on-show-at-the-british-museum/-accessed 29th May 2017.

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Picasso – Nude Woman at the Spring- 1962

Picasso Jacqueline Reading- 1962

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There is an interesting piece HERE about the British Museum acquiring the work and a video about them below.

All websites and links acccessed 29th May 2017.

Conclusion to Part 4- Assignment 4.

 

I have been quite astounded at times throughout this fourth part at how little I know and how much I had forgotten about photography. There are a lot of photographers and artists I had completely forgotten about and also ones I had never come across before. I was convinced that I would do OK throughout this part but I found out quite soon that I knew not as half as much as I thought.

hockney_my_mother_Bolton_Abbey_Yorkshire

https://theartstack.com/artist/david-hockney/my-mother-bolton-abbey– accessed 19th May 2017

As I have worked through each project I know I have been down at times at having to read and then re-read what was asked but then once I had  started to research more I felt I got a better grasp of things. I liked the holiday photo project as it made me revisit lots of images I had buried away and it was a nice feeling to look at them and answer the question  ‘How do they make you feel?’

I found by researching the origins of The Photobus by Daniel Meadows, it brought me into a whole new realm of photographers I had never heard of and whose work I now truly love  just from researching further, such as Richard Billingham and John Davies.

I really like my learning log now and I like to use it to show things I wouldn’t normally. Even just a few pictures from a day out that I like or have felt were interesting to me, I find I want to post them as it is part of the whole learning and documenting process. I recently visited the Catholic Cathedral in Liverpool and I spent most of the time looking for the public art pieces. I was so excited to look at the John Piper glass that is throughout it, that when I got home I had taken over 100 pictures of it. It is things like this that make me like my camera again and although I won’t keep them all, sometimes it is just good to take yourself out for the day and find something you like, photograph it and find out about its history.

I think I have gained a lot from this part and it has been quite cathartic at times but it has also made me look and research further to find more about things that have sparked my interest. I found that just one photographers image on an internet search has led me to find so much more. I think this is what is so good about photography, there is always something to see, even if you think it has all been done or you have already seen it, you are only ever scratching the surface.

I am looking forward to Part 5 Textiles very much as it is something I am interested in for further courses and I am curious to find out more and how the initial processes make it all work together.

 

Exercise 3- An Elevated Viewpoint.

Derek Trillo, The Cheshire Plain from Beeston Castle, 2008.

The viewpoint of the Cheshire Plain shows you elements of the land that you wouldn’t normally see. The split in the field and the colours of the earth, the small hollows of trees together that you can see more clearly, the shape and the height is present from a higher view. At ground level you wouldn’t know how big things are, the square of trees wouldn’t be as pronounced, neither would the line in the ground showing the different colours of the earth. You would see it from a ground point but you wouldn’t see the scale of it or its differences.

City View – OCA Student – Peter Mansell

The city view gives the height of the tower blocks and the scale of the areas surrounding it. You can see a main road and a tiny bus on it so wherever this was taken is quite high up.  It gives you a feeling of space and how much the city and its buildings are sprawled around. If the picture was taken from a ground level then I suppose you would be looking up at things. The streets would be in lines and the buildings would be closer together and a feeling of being closed in may happen. You would see and hear and feel things, more colour and a mixture of different shops, business and housing.

John Davies, Agecroft Power Station, Salford, 1983.

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Agecroft Colliery, Salford 1983- http://johndavies.uk.com/– accessed 22nd May 2017.

I love power stations and cooling towers. I think they are wonderful concrete marvels and as this picture was taken when I was one and it has since been demolished I feel an affinity with the towers as they aren’t that far from where I live and I will have to imagine them through pictures.

By taking the picture of the cooling towers from a distance you can see the surrounding land and the scale of how big the power station was. It looks gritty and industrial but with life carrying on all around it. The cars, the football match, what looks like the river beside it.

The outlying countryside that surrounds it looks peaceful and full of nature and life. Everything just carries on with the towers in view.

I looked further into the cooling towers and there is a bit about them here- http://openbuildings.com/buildings/agecroft-power-station-profile-29614

and here- http://salfordonline.com/6690-watch-agecroft-power-station-demolition-revisited-for-90th-anniversary.html

and here- http://www.engineering-timelines.com/scripts/engineeringItem.asp?id=1001

all websites accessed 22nd May 2017.