Visits- The People’s History Museum, Manchester.

Two things were to be visited on my trip out- Paul Peter Piechs exhibition and also a proper look around The People’s History Museum.

I was very excited about both but I had to restrain and do it in parts so as not to miss anything. I started with a cup of tea in the cafe.

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On the museums website there is this;

‘The origins of the museum lie in the 1960s when a group of pioneer activists began to collect labour history material at a time when the museum world was largely uninterested.  They believed strongly in the importance of collecting and preserving items belonging to working people.  They opened the National Museum of Labour History in London in 1975.

In the 1980s, with the museum’s future threatened by a lack of funding, the collection was rescued by Manchester City Council and the Greater Manchester authorities, with the help of the TUC.  Local champions who believed in the importance of the collection fought for the museum to come to Manchester and the museum reopened on Princess Street in 1990 in the building where the first meeting of the TUC took place over one hundred years earlier.’

http://www.phm.org.uk/about-us/history/-accessed 3rd March 2017

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Secret Society Skeleton Painting- Taken from PHM website;

‘This painting shows a skeleton, the Grim Reaper, holding a scythe in one hand and an hourglass in the other. The painting is larger than life-size, rolled around a pole in a carrying box. Trade societies (early trade unions) used the painting during their initiation ceremonies. New members would be blindfolded and would recite a secret ‘oath of allegiance’. When the oath was done the painting would drop from the box, the blindfold removed and the new member was presented with a shocking reminder of their own mortality.

The image is a stark reminder of the damnation that waited for those who break their promises. The painting dates from the early 19th century, a time when trade societies were illegal and meetings of this kind had to be held in secret. At the People’s History Museum the painting is hung in a mock secret society meeting room where James Hogarth has just become a member of the Tinplate Workers’ Society. The scene depicts the skeleton painting still hanging on the wall while The Bible James swore on and the gun held to his head as he recited the oath both lay on the table.’

http://www.phm.org.uk/our-collection/secret-society-skeleton-painting/-accessed 10th March 2017

It really is good and my firm favourite on top of all the other favourites I have adopted.

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I really loved all the banners and the posters. There seems to be one for every group, every job and every strike which I liked very much. The walk around takes you through lots of different era’s and I did a lot of writing things down to look up later.

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Excellent font.

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I really liked this bag, I researched more when I got home and I found this:

‘The Morning Star is the only socialist daily newspaper published in Great Britain. It has a long and proud history.

Originally called The Daily Worker, the Morning Star was founded by the Communist Party of Great Britain and first published on 1 January 1930. The aim was, in Lenin’s words, to provide “an economic and political tool of the masses in their struggle”. Since 1945 the paper has been owned by a broad-based readers’ co-operative, the People’s Press Printing Society (PPPS). The paper’s editorial line remains anchored in the political programme of the Communist Party of Britain but it offers a broad left perspective on political, industrial and international issues. The Daily Worker was renamed the Morning Star in 1966.’

http://dailyworker.co.uk/-accessed 10th March 2017

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Spanish Civil War banners and dolls.

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With original stickers.

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Dream date.

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 The textile conservation studio, was a highlight as you can see through the window, but your not allowed in. It is a dream job making something that is so old and socially  important all new again which can then be shown for years to come-  http://www.phm.org.uk/our-collection/textile-conservation-studio/– accessed 10th March 2017.

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It really is a great place to visit and I feel that even though I went round it all, I have still missed bits so I will have to go again. You can also become a supporter of the museum by looking here- http://www.phm.org.uk/support-us/

Join-the-Radicals

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