Visits- Picasso Lino Cuts, Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight.

Back in January I went to see the Picasso lino cut exhibition at The Lady Lever Gallery in Port Sunlight. It was my first trip there and also my first time driving through the Birkenhead tunnel so lots of new things to see.

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The Lady Lever is a lovely place and Port Sunlight was a treat as I had never been before and had no idea what to expect.

‘The village was founded by ‘Soap King’ William Hesketh Lever in 1888. The village was built to house Lever’s ‘Sunlight Soap’ factory workers, but today is home to a fascinating museum, beautiful architecture, a world-class art gallery, stunning parkland and a thriving community.’

http://portsunlightvillage.com/about-us/-accessed 29th May 2017.

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‘The Lady Lever Art Gallery houses one of the UK’s finest collections of fine and decorative art. It has the best collection of Wedgwood jasperware anywhere in the world and its collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings is internationally renowned. 

The gallery was founded by William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925) and is dedicated to the memory of his wife Elizabeth.  Lever wanted to share his collections with the public. At first he used the library for small displays, but he needed a bigger building for his collections. Lever personally selected works of art from his huge collection for the gallery. The gallery still contains the best of his personal art collection.’

http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ladylever/about/– accessed 29th May 2017

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Arriving at the gallery I saw the beauty of The Leverhulme Memorial, designed by James Lomax-Simpson, and the sculptor was William Reid Dick. It consists of an obelisk with a figure on the top, with a separate group of four figures beside it. The memorial was unveiled in 1930. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leverhulme_Memorial-accessed 29th May 2017.

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Napoleons death mask.

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DeidreJacob Epstein– Bronze, modelled in 1942.

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The linocuts are owned by the British Museum and some of them have never been seen outside of London before so I was excited to be able to see them. They all focus on the later part of Picasso’s career from the 1950’s and 60’s.

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Pablo Picasso (1881–1973), Nature morte sous la Lampe (Still Life under the Lamp). Linocut, 1962.-http://britishmuseum.org/whats_on/exhibitions/picasso_linocuts.aspx– accessed 29th May 2017.

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It was really beautiful up close and I only had my phone to take sneak pictures so they really don’t do it justice.

‘Colour linocuts are usually made with a different block for each colour, but Picasso was unique in his use of a single block to achieve the same effect in what is known as the ‘reductive’ method. After printing the first colour, the lino plate is cleaned before cutting away the areas that will not be printed in the next colour. This process is repeated for the subsequent layers, until the print is complete.’

http://www.palatinate.org.uk/important-picasso-linocuts-on-show-at-the-british-museum/-accessed 29th May 2017.

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Picasso – Nude Woman at the Spring- 1962

Picasso Jacqueline Reading- 1962

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There is an interesting piece HERE about the British Museum acquiring the work and a video about them below.

All websites and links acccessed 29th May 2017.

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